Worship in ‘Corona-tide’: to help face uncertainty – new skills and old treasures

IN MY rather touching naiveté, I spoke with the editor of this esteemed organ in March about writing something in late spring about the post-Covid Church. This ludicrous deadline had to be extended to the summer and then to autumn and now I find myself in winter, writing not about what happens after Covid, but about how the Church can adapt to this new long season of Corona-tide, and what we may have learnt thus far.

IN MY rather touching naiveté, I spoke with the editor of this esteemed organ in March about writing something in late spring about the post-Covid Church. This ludicrous deadline had to be extended to the summer and then to autumn and now I find myself in winter, writing not about what happens after Covid, but about how the Church can adapt to this new long season of Corona-tide, and what we may have learnt thus far.

The most striking thing we have seen is that the secular world and its thinkers have been found wanting. The dominant philosophy of the day, secular liberalism, does not have the ability to account for a pandemic. It offers no bigger picture or ultimate narrative to help humanity grapple with life, death and our new awareness of the thinness between the two. Suddenly the modern mantra ‘I believe in science’ is exposed as a fallacy. It may remain haute couture for the emperors of public discourse, but for those seeking meaning and something of substance to shelter and comfort them through life and death, it is revealed to be the same old birthday suit sold at a very high price.